Quarks to Quasars


Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions by Yan Liang

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)


Minimalist Poster Series Honors Science’s Women PioneersMinimalist Poster Series Honors Science’s Women Pioneers


Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs

Yay me! :)


mindblowingscience:

heythereuniverse:

NASA plans a robotic mission to search for life on Europa | io9

It looks like it’s finally going to happen, an actual mission to Jupiter’s icy moon Europa — one of the the solar system’s best candidates for hosting alien life.

Yesterday, NASA announced an injection of $17.5 billion from the federal government (down by $1.2 billion from its 2010 peak). Of this, $15 million will be allocated for “pre-formulation” work on a mission to Europa, with plans to make detailed observations from orbit and possibly sample its interior oceans with a robotic probe. Mission details are sparse, but if all goes well, it could be launched by 2025 and arriving in the early 2030s.

This is incredibly exciting. Recent evidence points to a reasonable chance of habitability. Its massive subsurface ocean contains almost twice as much water as found on Earth. The water is kept in liquid state owing to the gravitational forces exerted by Jupiter and the moon’s turbulent global ocean currents. The good news is that a probe may not have to dig very deep to conduct its search for life; the moon’s massive plumes are ejecting water directly onto the surface.

[Read more]

THIS MAKES ME REALLY EXCITED!


Wow. 15100. Thank youuuu. :)

A Hurricane on Saturn

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)


More Spectacular Aerial Shots of Iceland’s Volcanic Rivers

(Source: mymodernmet.com)


Hubble’s Sexiest Spiral Galaxies

(Source: news.discovery.com)


Incredible Photos Emerge of the 1986 Challenger Shuttle Disaster

Many people watched the Challenger Space Shuttle take off on January 28, 1986 and tragically combust less than two minutes into its flight. Now, nearly 28 years since the catastrophic event, photos of the shuttle’s takeoff and unexpected explosion have emerged via Michael Hindes. While rummaging through some of his grandfather’s old boxes, following the passing of his grandmother, the West Springfield, Massachusetts resident discovered a number of images documenting the disaster.

While many looked on in horror almost three decades ago, those feelings of heartbreak are felt once again today through these images taken by a photographer who was a friend and coworker of Hindes’ grandfather, a former contractor for NASA. The moving images stir up old emotions of an event that was meant to be a bright story, especially since Christa McAuliffe was aboard as the first intended teacher in space. Now, these historical photos serve as a remembrance of the lives tragically lost.


Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo


Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music." | Betrand Russell

(Source: nicconoh)


NASA Releases First Ever Photograph of Saturn, Venus, Mars and Earth

You might remember earlier this summer when NASA released a striking image taken by the Cassini spacecraft of Earth as it appears from the dark side of Saturn. Yesterday the space agency wowed again with the first ever photograph of Saturn, Mars, Venus, and Earth all in the same shot. The image spans about 404,880 miles (651,591 kilometers) across and is made from 141 wide-angle photos taken by Cassini. You can learn more about the image over on JPL’s site where you can even download some wallpapers. This is a good excuse to watch an interpretation of Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot monologue. Or this one. (via PetaPixel)


Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries

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